Crafting a Compelling Startup Vision

kevin-holmes
Read more by Kevin Holmes

Kevin started Founders Network to help tech founders achieve success through peer mentorship. Prior to Founders Network, Kevin advised hundreds of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs from idea stage through funding. Kevin was named “40 Under 40 in Silicon Valley” by the Silicon Valley Business Journal for his work with startups and promoting entrepreneurship. He has served on the adjunct faculty at both Santa Clara University Leavey School of Business and the University of San Francisco School of Business. Kevin holds a bachelor’s degree and a Master of Business Administration from Santa Clara University.

1 min read

A compelling vision statement is a valuable tool for startup founders. In large corporations a vision statement helps organize and motivate and existing group of people around a shared picture of a desired future state. In startups the purpose of a vision statement is less about creating clarity among an existing group and more about inspiring a new group to work together, often with no or reduced pay.  But what are the components of a compelling startup vision?  Is a clear startup vision always necessary?  How is a vision different from your mission?  This edition of Good News for Founders offers resources to help you understand what makes a compelling startup vision and how to craft or refine one for your startup.

  • Inspiring a shared vision is one of the fundamentals of leading a startup.  Read this Harvard Business Review article on Barry Posner and Jim Kouzes Leadership Challenge.
  • Lifehacker’s take on the difference between vision and mission: mission is what you do every day, vision is where you want to go.  You don’t need both.
  • Jim Collins (author of Good to Great) has this framework and this guide available for crafting a vision.
  • Erica Olsen’s youtube breakdown of the components of a compelling vision.

 

kevin-holmes
Read more by Kevin Holmes

Kevin started Founders Network to help tech founders achieve success through peer mentorship. Prior to Founders Network, Kevin advised hundreds of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs from idea stage through funding. Kevin was named “40 Under 40 in Silicon Valley” by the Silicon Valley Business Journal for his work with startups and promoting entrepreneurship. He has served on the adjunct faculty at both Santa Clara University Leavey School of Business and the University of San Francisco School of Business. Kevin holds a bachelor’s degree and a Master of Business Administration from Santa Clara University.

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